The causes

Social exclusion is caused by cultural decline and social fragmentation which is caused by political and social failure. This is we believe a persistent failure of society and part of social progress and rather than find fault and apportion blame as many people do (which only adds to the conflict) Qultura's focus is on providing effective support to individual people and promoting cultural development in local communities. You can read more about cultural decline below. 

Social theory

Social exclusion is caused by cultural decline and social fragmentation which is caused by political and social failure. This is we believe a persistent failure of society and part of social progress and rather than find fault and apportion blame as many people do (which only adds to the conflict) Qultura's focus is on providing effective support to individual people and promoting cultural development in local communities. You can read more about cultural decline below. 

Our theory

Social exclusion is caused by cultural decline and social fragmentation which is caused by political and social failure. This is we believe a persistent failure of society and part of social progress and rather than find fault and apportion blame as many people do (which only adds to the conflict) Qultura's focus is on providing effective support to individual people and promoting cultural development in local communities. You can read more about cultural decline below. 

Key issues

About social exclusion

Social exclusion is linked to social fragmentation.

Social exclusion can be either a lifestyle choice or a social issue caused by a sequence of social interactions which have traumatic or negative outcomes affecting one person and is one of the fastest growing and widespread social issues affecting people in society today.

What is social exclusion?

Let's start with social exclusion as a lifestyle choice. Some people choose to restrict their amount of social interaction and contact with society for artistic, spiritual or emotional reasons. Think of a monk joining a religious order and entering a monastery, a nun who joins a convent, or a writer who chooses to isolate themselves for the purpose of writing and seclusion. This is not the focus of this website.

The focus of this website is on social exclusion as a social issue, which is not chosen by the people it affects but is the outcome of negative or traumatic social experiences by different, unrelated people which forms a social process which can have profound and devastating effects on someone's life, their health, their position in society and their self-esteem.

Internal and external social exclusion.

Social exclusion is centred around perceived experience which is unique and highly individual to the person it affects. As it is caused by social interaction being affected by dysfunctional social and cultural beliefs it has both internal and external aspects both of which create completely different issues.

External social exclusion

External social exclusion is the outcome of social and political failure and incompetent or inefficient management of a social infrastructure and economy. A key aspect of dealing with social exclusion is that, incompetent and inefficient strategies for managing social exclusion can get very resource hungry very quickly, draining public resources and creating consequences which are felt by everyone in society. The effects of social exclusion are felt in some way by everyone in society so it is highly desirable that effective strategies are implemented to maintain social cohesion, order and structure in a way which is beneficial to everyone.

Internal social exclusion

Human beings are social animals and social exclusion can quickly become internalized resulting in numerous issues and causing fear, stress, hardship, suffering, and can lead to such issues as antisocial behaviour, mental illness, addiction, social division, crime, unemployment, premature death and suicide.

Internal social exclusion is largely a matter of perception of one's environment and cultural awareness though it is also caused by environmental factors and social and cultural attitudes.

People who are affected usually feel that they are being denied opportunities unfairly, that they are excluded by other people, that they are not being listened to or they feel misunderstood. They also feel that they are being held back or restricted, treated unfairly,  or held responsible for things which have happened in their lives over which they had no control and little or no opportunity to do anything about it.

Internal social exclusion is a stressful and distressing experience which often leaves the affected person unable or ill-equipped to deal with their circumstances and can easily lead to a second process where the person seeks to isolate themselves in order to cope with their situation.

Please read - extremely important

Dealing with social exclusion

There have been numerous academic studies and research done into social exclusion and it is a vast area which involves many different aspects of different social issues. There is very little on effective strategies to tackle social exclusion.

There is a reason for this.

That reason is human individuality. Social exclusion as a subject area is vast and incredibly complex because it affects different individual people in different ways. Social exclusion is based on individual human perception - it is something they feel, they perceive, and something they experience on a daily basis.

The causes of the social exclusion in each individual case may also be complex and have a vast multitude of different causes. Social exclusion is not only based on individual perception, it is also triggered by a learned emotional response from a traumatic experience which may have happened at any point in that person's life - early childhood, childhood, developing into adulthood or later.

Supporting people affected by social exclusion and tackling social exclusion involves risks. External intervention is generally unhelpful and can often result in pushing someone deeper into social exclusion and exacerbating the issues associated with the social exclusion process. This can result in 'breaking' someone so that they are unable to function in society, have little realistic hope for recovery, or worse, lead to someone committing suicide.

Furthermore providing support for people affected by social exclusion or attempting to tackle social exclusion can get very resource hungry very quickly if you don't know what you are doing. Instead of resolving issues you could easily end up creating even bigger issues which require even more resources to resolve.

Tackling social exclusion therefore requires extensive individual research, it requires sustained and continuous effort, and it requires effective support strategies based on meaningful occupation and primary social interaction - interaction which is pleasant, reaffirming and positive. This applies equally to those who are seeking support and those who are providing support.

To give you some idea it takes a single day to provide someone who is street homeless with accommodation, but it can take years for them to fully recover psychologically and emotionally from the experience.

The only effective way of tackling social exclusion is by finding a way to effectively reverse the process on an individual basis. All such strategies require the provision of opportunities and need to be fully participant centred. .

Resolving social exclusion

Social exclusion is a process which can only be resolved by effectively reversing the process with a new process which undoes the damage of the exclusion process and reverses the harmful, detrimental effects of the original process.

Social stigma

Social stigma is a key contributing factor which often leads to social exclusion. Follow the link below to learn about social stigma.

Aspects of social exclusion

Universal credit

Universal Credit is the new 'one size fits all' system of social security which will replace all other in work benefits in the UK in 2018.

The purpose of this benefit system is to provide people who are unable to work and support themselves financially with a basic income until such point as they can return to work and support themselves.

The problem is that many benefit claimants are affected by social exclusion which prevents them from finding work and being able to support themselves. This problem is often made worse by the conditionality and requirement to seek work which is inflexible and the fact that the Department of Work and Pensions doesn't take into account environmental and social factors when deciding claims.

Qultura is developing a new support network for Universal Credit claimants which places a much greater emphasis on social and environmental factors as we believe that changes in these areas can often provide claimants with much more realistic opportunities of eventually finding work and occupation.

What you can do

Qultura is working to develop a system of local community support networks which can provide effective support to people affected by social exclusion and which can not only work to reduce the level of social exclusion in a community, but also prevent other people from being affected by social exclusion and it's profound and devastating effects on the lives of individual people. We are looking for people to get involved and help develop this network of community support as well as offering support to those affected by social exclusion themselves.